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Belvac Innovation at Metpack

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact: Carolyn Crouch, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., 434-832-6369

 

Belvac to unveil its Innovation in Machines, Tooling and Product Development
at the MetPack show on May 2nd thru May 6th in Essen, Germany

 

LYNCHBURG, VA (April 24, 2017) – Belvac Production Machinery, Inc., a world leader in the design and production of continuous motion rotary machinery used by beverage and food can manufacturers around the globe, is pleased to unveil its latest Innovations at the upcoming MetPack show, the world’s leading fair for the metal packaging industry.

Belvac’s press release issued on April 3rd announced the introduction of a world class source for a fully integrated Front-End solution with the addition of Belvac’s Cupping Press and the CanFormer CFT400 (bodymaker/trimmer combination), which will be featured at MetPack. The new trimmer integrated into the above system, along with its standalone version known as the BT400, features an extended can height range, significantly reduced height and diameter change over times, and a burr free trimmed can along with properly positioned tin line relative to any bodymaker.

Furthermore, Belvac will showcase its manufacturing capabilities to produce high quality and superior strength ceramic can tooling such as necking dies and knock-outs.  Belvac now offers a complete solution from container and tooling design to delivery of ceramic tooling at the industry’s lowest lead times. 

Additionally, Belvac’s industry leading commitment to innovation has led to the development of the next generation of can making technology! Coming to MetPack (Hall 3 Booth 3C58), Belvac will feature a prototype metal forming machine with capability to expand, neck, shape, emboss and thread preforms in a one-step process.

 

Belvac provides beverage can makers with high-speed cup forming, bodymaking, trimming, necking, base reprofiling and reforming, shaping, bottom rim coating, flanging and inspection technology as well as ceramic tooling solutions. Learn more about us at www.belvac.com.

Belvac is an operating company within Dover Corporation’s Refrigeration & Food Equipment Segment.  Dover is a diversified global manufacturer with annual revenue exceeding $7 billion. Recognized for an entrepreneurial approach for over 60 years, Dover’s team of 29,000 employees takes an ownership mindset, collaborating with customers to redefine what's possible. Headquartered in Downers Grove, Illinois, Dover trades on the New York Stock Exchange under "DOV." Additional information is available at dovercorporation.com.

Belvac & Shuler enter exclusive partnership

 

Contact: Carolyn Crouch, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., 434-832-6369

 

Belvac and Schuler enter exclusive partnership to deliver a Bodymaker with Trimmer combination machine: the Belvac Can Former/Trimmer 400 (CFT 400); and a Cupping Press; the Belvac Cupping Press.

 

LYNCHBURG, VA (April 3, 2017) – Belvac Production Machinery, Inc. a world leader in the design and production of continuous motion rotary machinery used by beverage and food can manufacturers around the globe, is pleased to announce an exclusive partnership with the Schuler Group of Goppingen, Germany. This partnership with Schuler, a world leader in metal forming technology for the automobile industry and multiple other industries including can making, emphasizes Belvac’s commitment to excellence for its can making customers around the world.

“This  is a unique & exciting partnership,” noted Richard Steigerwald, President of Belvac Production Machinery, Inc. “Schuler will exclusively supply us with their proven bodymaker design which when combined with Belvac’s brand new world class trimmer design creates the market leading CFT 400. In combination with the proven Schuler designed cupping press, Belvac is now positioned to provide can manufacturers worldwide with not only a clear competitive choice but technical leadership in all the critical areas of metal displacement and inspection systems within can making. Belvac can now provide cupping presses and systems, can formers, trimmers, (or CFT 400- can former & trimmer combination) bottom can coating, necking, bottom reforming, bottom re profiling, light testing, and vision integration at speeds and throughput performance that lead the industry.”

“Because of its special hypo-cycloid drive, the entire design of our new bodymaker is an advantage over current conventional machines by the completely balanced unit, which means there is less vibration and no need for a foundation”, says Johannes Linden, head of the Systems division at Schuler. “In addition, the Schuler cupping press with its dynamic mass counterbalance, offers a complete foundation free front-end area to the customer. Our cupping presses are well acknowledged in the beverage can market, producing cups of high quality at high speed due to the play free, maintenance free slide guiding system design.”

Belvac’s equipment touches many of the brands consumers use on a regular basis—from internationally popular sodas, nutritional drinks, energy drinks to cans for the alcoholic beverage industry and even some food can applications. Belvac believes that this partnership is enabling its customers to achieve the best-in-class manufacturing goals they seek which directly contributes to improved customer operating profitability.

“This new partnership will allow our customers to have a world class source for a fully integrated Front-End solution with the addition of Belvac’s Cupping Press and the CanFormer CFT 400 leading into our world class Belvac Necking Systems”, says Belvac’s President. “Belvac will be the only company in the world offering this level of integrated package.”

According to Mr. Steigerwald, “We’re committed to leading the market, which requires thoroughly listening to our customers, therefore allowing us to continually improve the technological capabilities of can making. We remain hard at work striving to develop the next generation of can making technology. This outstanding partnership with the Schuler Group is just the next step in a long line of enhanced Belvac offerings which will continue under the financial and operational leadership of Dover Corporation, our parent company.”

Visit us at MetPack in Essen, Germany May 02-06, 2017 Hall 3 Booth 3C58 for the unveiling of the CanFormer/Trimmer CFT 400.

   

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Belvac is the world leader in the design and production of continuous motion rotary machinery. Belvac provides beverage can makers with high-speed trimming, necking, base reprofiling and reforming, shaping, bottom rim coating, flanging and inspection technology. Belvac continues innovation and solutions by offering Belvac Ceramic tooling Solutions to our current services provided in addition to Container Engineering. Learn more about us at www.belvac.com.

Belvac is an operating company within Dover Corporation’s Refrigeration & Food Equipment Segment.  Dover is a diversified global manufacturer with annual revenue exceeding $7 billion. Recognized for an entrepreneurial approach for over 60 years, Dover’s team of 29,000 employees takes an ownership mindset, collaborating with customers to redefine what's possible. Headquartered in Downers Grove, Illinois, Dover trades on the New York Stock Exchange under "DOV." Additional information is available at dovercorporation.com.

Schuler is the world market leader in metal forming technology. The company supplies presses, automation solutions, dies, process know-how, and services for the entire metalworking industry and lightweight automotive design. Customers include automobile manufacturers and suppliers as well as companies from the forging, household appliances, packaging, energy, electronics industries and minting presses. 

Belvac In The News

As appeared in Manufacturing Today, January/February 2014

When people enjoy a can of their favorite soda or beer, they often overlook the container that was used to store it and keep it fresh. But Lynchburg, Va.-based Belvac Production Machinery Inc. plays a role in that important process.

The company designs and manufactures continuous motion rotary machinery for two-piece can manufacturing. President Richard Steigerwald explains that Belvac’s history goes back to 1962, when founder Alphonse Stroobants started the company as a machine shop.

Initially, Stroobants served local businesses in Lynchburg. However, “The business grew slowly and steadily enough,” Steigerwald says, explaining that Stroobants eventually built a 25,000-square-foot facility for the company that has had additions over the years.

In 1975, the firm grew its reach to a worldwide market with the introduction of an advanced rotary can cutting machine. In 1978, it added a bottom coating machine and in 1982, it bought the Colorado division of Irvin Industries, which manufactured a necking machine licensed from Coors.

In 1990, Stroobants sold the company, which went through a leveraged buyout before becoming part of the Dover Corp. in 1993. Today, two-piece can manufacturing machines comprise the main focus of Belvac, which has a staff of 250 and has employees located across the world in locations such as Europe, Dubai and China, Steigerwald says.

“We set a revenue record in 2013,” he says, noting that the company expects to set another this year. “That’s a credit to the ownership that has allowed the company to be autonomous and explore its markets as it has over the years.”

He adds that Belvac serves a tightly knit base of approximately 50 customers. While the firm’s clients include some food and beverage companies, “We primarily serve can makers,” Steigerwald says. “We’re in 15 regional markets around the world.

“We have expanded our scope of supply, providing container design concepts for metal bottles, shaped cans; integration into specialty equipment (Bottle Can Manufacturing Systems and Shaping Solution Systems) solutions, including real time monitoring of equipment performance, all of which leads our industry.”

A Dependable Source

After all these years, Belvac has earned a strong reputation in its market, Steigerwald says. “We are viewed as a very trustworthy, consistent supplier who is always trying to control costs of operations for the customers,” he states. “We’re [also] viewed as a company that has a level of dependability.”

Belvac has earned this status thanks to the commitment of its entire staff, Director of Supply Chain Jack O’Brien says. “They pour a lot of heart and soul in the business,” he says. “That’s helped differentiate us from most of our competition and most manufacturers in other industries, as well.”

Steigerwald also credits Belvac’s success to its ongoing commitment to remaining innovative. Continuously, the company looks for ways to reduce energy costs for its customers through components and equipment designs.

This fits the demands of the market, which has recently added different size requirements on packaging and reduced changeover times. “We’re stepping up to those challenges,” he asserts. “[We also want] to show key customers that we are environmentally conscious.”

He adds that Belvac is trying to find ways to reduce its own manufacturing costs, as well. For instance, “We’re looking at different methods of lubrication on the equipment,” he says.

Only the Best

Belvac ensures that it provides clients with the best products by maintaining relationships with the best suppliers in the world. “[They] are very key to what makes Belvac successful,” Steigerwald says.

O’Brien notes that several factors determine what suppliers Belvac chooses to work with, including the level of expertise and equipment that the suppliers have. “[This is especially important] because of the precision and the speed of the can-making machines we produce,” he says.

“A high level of skill and knowledge [are also required] to produce those components,” he says. “It’s really about trying to find a supply base that is looking for more of a partnership and not just adding another customer to their mix.”

One supplier that Belvac has that relationship with is Fox Valley Tool & Die Inc., based in Kaukauna, Wis. O’Brien notes that Belvac has partnered closely with the firm in a way that goes beyond the normal supplier-customer relationship. “Our arrangement over the last couple of years has worked out for both organizations as a result,” he says.

For instance, Fox Valley recently started producing a component for Belvac after another manufacturer had discontinued production on the part. “Fox Valley and a couple other suppliers ... really stepped up and got involved in an area where they hadn’t been involved in before,” he recalls.

Additionally, Fox Valley often contacts Belvac to ask its client’s opinion on new areas where it can provide service. “[As they make] enhancements in their own organization, [we’re] involved in those discussions,” O’Brien says.

Another supplier Belvac partners with is IndTool Inc., a provider of CNC machining services based in Burlington, N.C. “They view Belvac as a partner,” O’Brien asserts. “They really go the extra mile to make sure that we’re successful. Our success is their success, as well.”

O’Brien also praises Sencon Inc., a Bedford Park, Ill.-based provider of sensors and controls. “They’ve worked well with our engineering group to make sure that the technology they put in meets [the needs of] our equipment,” he says. “Over the last several years, we’ve really increased the speed of our machines. They’ve worked well with our electrical and design group in making sure they have answers to satisfy our [needs] moving forward.”

Steigerwald agrees and also praises the company. “Sencon is the standard in the industry for two-piece can-making and inspection,” he says. “They are really a well-accepted standard to our customers and very well thought of.”

Belvac also maintains high standards when hiring, Steigerwald says. He explains that the company looks for people with a wide range of experiences and skill sets. “It’s important that a business at this level has some people with exposure to global supply chain development, the latest equipment, lean selling manufacturing and innovative design concepts for improving energy consumption,” he says.

But enthusiasm for the business is also required, Steigerwald asserts. “You’ve got to be dedicated to manufacturing,” he says. “You need to have an appreciation for the whole process.”

Belvac’s Lean Journey

In the past six years, Belvac has significantly invested in lean processes, including adding manufacturing cells in its machine shop and modularizing its assembly processes. “We really changed the layout of the organization and enhanced our warehousing,” O’Brien says.

The firm also applied lean to its assembly departments to make them more efficient. From 2010 through 2013, the company saw 15 to 20 percent improvement. But although Belvac has seen a marked improvement in how it processes material, its work is not done, O’Brien asserts.

“It’s not something that we ever complete,” he says. “If you get to a point where you can’t do anything more, you’re not thinking outside the box enough. [We’re still] changing the entire warehouse organization in how to process and how to stock.”

Steigerwald adds that he is pleased by the results. “Some of the improvements that we’ve put in have saved millions of dollars and have allowed us to rationalize costs,” he says.

Belvac’s strategy in the current economic climate, Steigerwald notes, is to establish itself as a key component supplier in its industry. “Over the last couple of years, we’ve tried to make our product capability as broad as possible, given the somewhat narrow scope of our customer base,” Steigerwald says.

In addition, Belvac needs to continue to innovate in order to compete, Steigerwald believes. “We have to find ways to keep ourselves ahead [and] keep our name as the go-to company,” he explains. “I want to make sure that we’re innovative enough so that everyone’s always looking at us to catch up.”

He predicts the company will move into markets that are not currently involved in packaging.

For instance, “Africa and certain areas of the Pacific Rim are going to develop and become major influencers in how we provide solutions to some of these markets,” Steigerwald predicts. “These are key, critical areas that will create opportunities for this company for many years to come.” 

Can shaping systems on show at Drinktec

As appeared in The Canmaker September 2013.

The canmaking technology that has been used to create the Budweiser 'Bowtie' shaped cans is being demonstrated at the Drinktec 2013 show in Germany this week.

The 11.5oz wasted beer cans were developed by Anheuser-Busch InBev's subsidiary Metal Container Corp using metal forming technology from Virginia-based Belvac Production Machinery.

Belvac is demonstrating its latest Shaping and Bottle Container technology – first launched to the canmaking industry in 2011 – with a running machine shaping the sidewalls of an aluminium beverage container. Demonstrations will occur on the Belvac booth at throughout each day.

Belvac is one of a number of equipment suppliers offering technology that provides branding opportunities to drinks manufacturers, with can shaping and embossing systems, and aluminium bottle necking and finishing processes. 

Bowtie Budweiser can technology revealed

As appeared in The Canmaker, May 2013

Canmaking professionals attending the Cannex trade show in Atlanta this week are discovering how the new ‘Bowtie’ Budweiser cans due to be launched across the US on 6 May are being manufactured.

The aluminium Budweiser cans, described by brewer Anheuser-Busch InBev as the ‘world’s most unique’ and ‘like nothing seen before’ use a distinctive wasted shape reflecting the ‘bowtie’ long used for Budweiser over years.

A-B InBev said in a recent release that its engineers had to solve a number of technical challenges from when the project was started in 2010 to enable its canmaking factory at Newburgh, in New York state, to make the cans at high speed.

At Cannex, Belvac Production Machinery, based in Lynchburgh, Virginia, revealed how its new Vertical Shaper’ launched two years ago at a trade show in Germany, is used to create the novel style of the cans.

The machine uses 16 vertically-orientated turrets with tooling to modify the printed preforms before they are necked, also on a Belvac system. The cans, with a final volume of 11.3 ounces rather than the usual 12 ounces, are slightly heavier than normal to overcome the loads in the forming system.

Belvac’s recently appointed VP of branded package solutions Ricardo Ruiz de Gopegui showed examples of the cans on the company’s booth, along with videos of the machine. “Belvac had been getting a lot of inquiries from brand owners about new designs,” he said, “which is why Belvac is working on helping them. This is the first example of what is possible. It could be a game changer.”